Beer Review: Founding Fathers Brewing Co., Founding Fathers Lager Beer
05/25/2012

Ding Points: 50.00

Pour: 50.00, Nose: 50.00, Palate: 50.00, Mouth: 50.00, Global: 50.00

Tasting Notes:

This is a ruse, right?? It’s Yuengling, marketed by Rolling Rock, surely??

Even if that’s not the case, in a nutshell, this is still Yuengling. I’m generally not in the habit of dismissing beers with such an apparent lack of reflection and thought, but that was my first thought, and nearly 25 minutes later and 12 oz down, I can’t think of anything else.

A non-descript, straightforward copper color, with a woefully disappointing head and level of retention. Semi-sweet grains dominate the nose and the tastes, against a fairly thin mouthfeel, all followed by a bitter sweet finish and lingering aftertaste. Some, not-too-unpleasant, very light, sugary, caramel malts do come through but they are very thin on the palate. There’s a little yeastiness about the tastes too, but in a generic, lager-like manner. Sitting here right now, I find it difficult to believe that I would be able to tell it apart from Yuengling in a blind test.

Founding Fathers, Lager Beer

Founding Fathers, Lager Beer

I’m always troubled and very wary of any beer that appears to place a philosophy and a marketing strategy before all else, and in particular ahead of the stuff inside the bottle, and this is a pretty strong example of such a thing. This brings with it a pretty simple and predictable outcome that one might expect. It’s bland (if non-offensive), lifeless (if not exactly flat) and 100% forgettable (if not exactly horrid). A beer for either the tunnel vision American patriots, macro drinkers, or perhaps Yuengling lovers.

U-S-A!

U-S-A!

Apparently Founding Fathers Brewing Co. has an address in Latrobe, PA which of course means Rolling Rock to most folk, and to be honest this is a beer in the same class as that particular, ahem…..gem. In fact, Founding Fathers Lager Beer is so ‘macro’ in almost every respect, it has me thinking that it might well be a stealth (pseudo) craft much like the Blue Moon brand. Apparently there is a ‘Light’ version of this, too. Can’t wait!

U-S-A!

U-S-A!

If you like Yuengling, you’ll most likely enjoy this too.

Other: 12 oz single. Amber Ale.


11 Comments

  1. Phil

    Thanks for your review. Founding Fathers Brewing Co. is not a craft beer. We have launched the new American owned lager and light that compete against the largest foreign owned breweries now operating in the US. Yes we are macro, there has not neen a new domestic premium introduced to compete with Bud, Miller, and Coors in our lifetime. Founding Fathers thought it was time for a change. “A beer for American patriots, macro drinkers, and Yuengling lovers”. Now you got it! 50% of all Founding Fathers profits support the families of the greatest military on earth. Keeping America Strong One Beer at a Time.

    PS. Inbev moved Rolling Rock to New Jersey.

    Reply
    • Ding

      I’m curious, and this is a genuine question – can you call yourself a ‘macro’ with your current production numbers?

      As for, ‘the greatest military on earth’, there Sir, you have yourself a debate.

      BTW – you left out ‘tunnel vision’ when quoting me!

      Reply
  2. Cody Mullins

    I’m a little curious, Ding, as to which country you believe has the best military on earth. And I’m even more curious as to why you believe you are qualified to make such idiotic statements.

    Reply
    • Ding

      ‘Best’ military on earth is obviously a subjective, opinion based thing.

      Which statement that I made do you consider ‘idiotic’? It obviously CANNOT be the one about me stating that a debate could be generated about the relative prowess of various armed services, so which one is it?

      Reply
  3. Cody Mullins

    Anyone with even the slightest understanding of military history and tactics knows that the U.S. military dominates. Of course other countries have great military forces, such as the British Royal Marines and various special forces units. However, I don’t believe you really meant to encourage a debate about military prowress, it seems more likely that you simply wanted to insult the U.S. military.

    Reply
    • Ding

      Ha, ha – you’re funny.

      Reply
  4. Dave

    To be honest, I only picked it up because I was on base, and I needed something better than PBR for my five dollars. This was on sale, 2.35 for a six pack, so I gave it a try.

    It’s not the best beer I’ve had, not even the best domestic, but it’s good for what it is. I support the organizations the company donates to, because when I was in the military they helped me out a lot. It’s not a micro, and it’s not fantastic, but it’s still a decent beer.

    I’ll be buying it again because it’s good beer for the money, not for any kind of political statement.

    Reply
  5. Ben

    Ding seems to have come into this review with more of an issue with the Military support this beer gives than with the beer itself. Then goes on to prove even more that it wasn’t about the beer as much as the company’s values that he/she seems to take issue with.

    But, that is the great part about America, everyone, including Ding can have an opinion and feel free to state such opinion openly. Thanks to the greatest military known to man, arguable only by those looking to argue.

    I don’t think Founding Fathers is for guys like Ding anyway. He’d prefer to go over analyze and break down the next Orange Spiced Quintuple Hopped Cat Urine Infused IPA while wearing his Birkenstocks and dreaming of a day wind power can reign supreme.

    Everyday people who just want a beer to drink will enjoy Founding Fathers and Founding Fathers Light.

    Reply
    • Ding

      Well, let’s review;

      1. I think that attaching ANY ‘non-beer’ philosophy to ANY beer is not wise.
      2. I think this beer is very ordinary.
      3. I think that ‘the best military on earth’ is a highly debatable subject.

      That’s it, nothing too controversial there I feel.

      BTW – I do not own any Birkenstock’s and I have zero interest in wind power.

      Reply
    • Christopher

      Right, because people who enjoy craft beer aren’t ‘every-day people’ and they call us beer geeks pretentious!

      Reply
  6. Christopher

    I love how the main valid point Ding brought up about whether or not the brewery can even call itself a macro was completely ignored and instead we got all this military and ‘proud american chest-thumping’ nonsense.

    Reply

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